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Carl Sagan

[1934-] Astronomer. Much maligned by Velikovskians as the archetypal uniformitarian. Hosted the "Cosmos" television program. Former husband of Lynn Margulis. Sagan, Carl Edward is the David Duncan Professor of Astronomy and Space Sciences and Director of the Laboratory for Planetary Studies at Cornell University. He has played a leading role in the Mariner, Viking, and Voyager spacecraft expeditions to the planets, for which he received the NASA Medals for Exceptional Scientific Achievement and (twice) for Distinguished Public Service. Once a research assistant of the Nobel Prize-winning geneticist H. J. Muller, his continuing research on the origin of life began in the 1950s. The Masursky Award from the American Astronomical Society cites "his extraordinary contributions to the development of planetary science... As a scientist trained in both astronomy and biology, Dr. Sagan has made seminal contributions to the study of planetary atmospheres, planetary surfaces, the history of the Earth, and exobiology. Many of the most productive planetary scientists working today are his present and former students and associates." His book Cosmos (accompanying his Emmy- and Peabody-award-winning television series of the same name) was the best-selling science book ever published in the English language. His novel Contact is soon to be major motion picture (Warner Bros.). Co-founder and President of The Planetary Society, he severs as Distinguished Visiting Scientist, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology. Dr. Sagan has received the Pulitzer Prize, the Oersted Medal, and many other awards - including eighteen honorary degrees from American colleges and universities - for his contributions to science, literature, education, and the preservation of the environment. [1934-] Astronomer. Much maligned by Velikovskians as the archetypal uniformitarian. Hosted the "Cosmos" television program. Former husband of Lynn Margulis. Sagan, Carl Edward is the David Duncan Professor of Astronomy and Space Sciences and Director of the Laboratory for Planetary Studies at Cornell University. He has played a leading role in the Mariner, Viking, and Voyager spacecraft expeditions to the planets, for which he received the NASA Medals for Exceptional Scientific Achievement and (twice) for Distinguished Public Service. Once a research assistant of the Nobel Prize-winning geneticist H. J. Muller, his continuing research on the origin of life began in the 1950s. The Masursky Award from the American Astronomical Society cites "his extraordinary contributions to the development of planetary science... As a scientist trained in both astronomy and biology, Dr. Sagan has made seminal contributions to the study of planetary atmospheres, planetary surfaces, the history of the Earth, and exobiology. Many of the most productive planetary scientists working today are his present and former students and associates." His book Cosmos (accompanying his Emmy- and Peabody-award-winning television series of the same name) was the best-selling science book ever published in the English language. His novel Contact is soon to be major motion picture (Warner Bros.). Co-founder and President of The Planetary Society, he severs as Distinguished Visiting Scientist, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology. Dr. Sagan has received the Pulitzer Prize, the Oersted Medal, and many other awards - including eighteen honorary degrees from American colleges and universities - for his contributions to science, literature, education, and the preservation of the environment. David Duncan Professor of Astronomy and Space Sciences; Director, Planetary Studies 302 Space Sciences Building, 607/255-4971 A.B. 1954, S.B. 1955, S.M. 1956, Ph.D. 1960 (Chicago) Among the geologically relevant research being done by Sagan and his associates in the planetary sciences study group are problems connected with spacecraft missions to the outer solar system. Examples include the tidal evolution of Saturn's moon Titan and the possibility of hydrocarbon oceans on its surface; aeolian comminution of particles on Mars and erosion of Martian land forms; analysis of surfaces in the outer solar system that seem to be covered with complex organic matter; and studies of the nature and evolution of the early environments of the Earth and Mars. Astronomer Carl Edward Sagan, a gifted storyteller who extolled and explored the grandeur and mystery of the universe in lectures, books and an acclaimed TV series, died Friday after a two-year battle with bone marrow disease. He was 62. Sagan died of pneumonia at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center in Seattle, where he had a bone-marrow transplant in April 1995, a center spokeswoman said. The center had identified his disease as myelodysplasia, a form of anemia also known as preleukemia syndrome.